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Blood Matters: A Journey Along the Genetic Frontier

Blood Matters A Journey Along the Genetic Frontier In genetic testing revealed that Masha Gessen had a mutation that predisposed her to ovarian and breast cancer The discovery initiated Gessen into a club of sorts the small but exponentially expa

  • Title: Blood Matters: A Journey Along the Genetic Frontier
  • Author: Masha Gessen
  • ISBN: 9780151013623
  • Page: 158
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In 2004 genetic testing revealed that Masha Gessen had a mutation that predisposed her to ovarian and breast cancer The discovery initiated Gessen into a club of sorts the small but exponentially expanding group of people in possession of a new and different way of knowing themselves through what is inscribed in the strands of their DNA As she wrestled with a wrenchinIn 2004 genetic testing revealed that Masha Gessen had a mutation that predisposed her to ovarian and breast cancer The discovery initiated Gessen into a club of sorts the small but exponentially expanding group of people in possession of a new and different way of knowing themselves through what is inscribed in the strands of their DNA As she wrestled with a wrenching personal decision what to do with such knowledge Gessen explored the landscape of this brave new world, speaking with others like her and with experts including medical researchers, historians, and religious thinkers Blood Matters is a much needed field guide to this unfamiliar and unsettling territory It explores the way genetic information is shaping the decisions we make, not only about our physical and emotional health but about whom we marry, the children we bear, even the personality traits we long to have And it helps us come to terms with the radical transformation that genetic information is engineering in our most basic sense of who we are and what we might become.

    • Free Read [Fiction Book] ↠ Blood Matters: A Journey Along the Genetic Frontier - by Masha Gessen ✓
      158 Masha Gessen
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Fiction Book] ↠ Blood Matters: A Journey Along the Genetic Frontier - by Masha Gessen ✓
      Posted by:Masha Gessen
      Published :2018-06-18T00:24:47+00:00

    1 thought on “Blood Matters: A Journey Along the Genetic Frontier

    1. From the synopsis you may think this is a book about how the author deals with being diagnosed with breast cancer, and not much more. However there is so much more to it. Clearly well researched this is an easily accessible book on genetics and it's influence on human disease. A must read for anyone with an interest in genetics.

    2. intersting tangents on genetics, from a russian lesbian whod had breast cancer and also is a really into it investigative reasearcher so she takes us into a lot of russian and jewish genetic places /research/philosophical dilemas/etc. not exactly a novel, but for me it was cool.

    3. Masha Gessen is a journalist of Ashkenazi jewish ancestry with a BRCA gene mutation that meant she watched her mother die of cancer and her statistical probability of getting ovarian or breast cancer was quite high. So she investigated the ways different populations with high hereditary instances of certain diseases deal with trying to control the diseases but still remain on an ethical/moral straight path.The book takes a look not only at BRCA gene counseling in the U.S but also a company that [...]

    4. Masha Gessen, a journalist in her late thirties, discovers through genetic testing that she carries a gene that makes her likely to develop breast and/or ovarian cancer. To help her decide whether and how to act on this knowledge, Gessen researches the history of genetic disease and genetic testing, and visits many scientists, past and present patients, and their families. The book is precisely written and gives a thorough, rigorously thoughtful take on heredity and what genetic testing means fo [...]

    5. Blood Matters is a thin volume packed with information on recent advances in the science of genetics told in a very personal manner. Masha Gessen was inspired to write Blood Matters after learning she had a mutation that increases her risk of breast and ovarian cancers.In the first chapter when Gessen is recounting her mother's death and her own fears about breast cancer I was reluctant to keep reading. I was afraid the book would be nothing more than a gnashing of teeth and self pity. Fortunate [...]

    6. A journalist with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer must first decide whether to get testing, and then, discovering she is positive, decide what action to take. Along the way she covers a lot of ground about what we can learn from our genes, the value of screening, whether patients are sophisticated enough to handle this information and the distress and anxiety of uncertainty.Written ten years ago, genetic testing was much less mainstream and discussed as a topic (this was prior to ' [...]

    7. This is more than a simple testimony from a patient suffering from a cancer and, her odyssey to better grasp her condition through the lense of medical science. Biology and history are here intertwined with ethics so as to question, bluntly and without passion the impact of our understanding of genetics so far.Without being sordid nor miserabilist she tells her doubt and fears (should she accept an oophorectomy? etc.) but, above all, expands her experience to write about eugenics (especially, st [...]

    8. I found this book fascinating and well written. Gessen is a journalist who is diagnosed as having an abnormality with her BRCA gene which predisposes her to an 85% chance of breast cancer and a 40% chance of ovarian cancer. Awful odds. On the way to making her decision about whether to have her breasts and/or ovaries removed She does some very interesting research into genetic diseases, and the amazing frontiers of genetic work. In addition to BRCA, she discusses Huntington's chorea, "bubble" ba [...]

    9. The author examines ever advancing world of genetics. She focuses on her own struggle to decide whether to have her breasts and ovaries removed after she tests positive for a gene that indicates she is likely to develop either breast or ovarian cancer. She also delves into many other areas related to genetic testing and medicine including why genes for some diseases tend to be found more frequently in some groups such as the Amish or Ashkenazi Jews. I found it to be a very interesting book that [...]

    10. I really enjoyed this book because the author tells an compelling story about her own journey with genetic testing but there is a lot of science and interviews to back up her opinions. This was great. It is easy to read because it feels like you're working with a friendc to work through some personal issues, but a lot of the scientific evidenceis right there and researched for you. You can get your science, educational and personal journey fix all in one book.

    11. 3 stars for some unfocused writing, but I liked the author's bitchy take on the BRCA genetic test decision-making process and wide range competence among doctors, as well as the subculture of cancer patients and people who test positive for the BRCA mutation.Essentially there are only 2 books written by women who've tested positive for BRCA gene mutation: Blood Matters and Pretty is What Changes. Both are required reading, as they are completely different takes on the subject matter.

    12. In the first and last chapters alone, this author tells a beautiful story about living in the midst of the genetic information age. She also offers a huge amount of research from a non-academic perspective. I was amazed to learn about genetic testing in Isreal, and came away with the hope that people can and will shape the future of science, not the converse.

    13. This book is sort of dumb about genetics (poor understanding of evolution being the main problem) even while it is appropriately skeptical about connections between genes and behavior and put off by the personalities of scientists. Gessen is compelling though; I guess I wanted it to be more memoir and less research. She is quite mean but mostly keeps the bite under wraps.

    14. 'Blood Matters' is really two books. One is about the author and her coming to terms with her genetic makeup. The other is about genetics. The first book is incredibly interesting, but sadly it ends about two-thirds of the way through, leaving the second book with no guiding narrative. It's still a compelling read and worth checking out.

    15. An interesting book. The author learns she has a genetic predisposition to breast cancer and ovarian cancer. She reports on the difficulty she has in making a decision whether on not to have her breasts and ovaries removed. She also includes chapters on families with a wide variety of genetic diseases and information on the current science of preventing and dealing with these diseases.

    16. Author discovers she has inherited a defective gene common in her Jewish ancestors. While she decides whether to have a complete hysterectomy and masectomy to prevent cancer, she discusses the frontier of genetic medicine and the ethical questions that surround the diseases.

    17. At times this book could be tedious. But I did like that the author not only focused on her own breast cancer gene mutation, but also on other gene mutations, as well, and how they are being treated. This is not a book that you can cuddle up with in bed.

    18. Very engaging probe into the implications of DNA testing for genetically inherited disorders, including Huntington's Disease, BRCA, PKD, and others. I wish Gessen had more to say about PGD and the reproductive politics surrounding these issues, though.

    19. From The New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2008 List. Super interesting and well written if you can get past the first few pages.

    20. I was so excited that this book was as accessible as it was. The subject matter could lend itself to a very dense scientific text but Masha Gessen managed to make it both readable and enjoyable.

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