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In the Last Analysis

In the Last Analysis When beautiful Janet Harrison asks English professor Kate Fansler to recommend a Manhattan psychoanalyst Kate immediately sends the girl to her dear friend and former lover Dr Emanuel Bauer Seven we

  • Title: In the Last Analysis
  • Author: Amanda Cross
  • ISBN: 9780380545100
  • Page: 146
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • When beautiful Janet Harrison asks English professor Kate Fansler to recommend a Manhattan psychoanalyst, Kate immediately sends the girl to her dear friend and former lover, Dr Emanuel Bauer Seven weeks later, the girl is stabbed to death on Emanuel s couch with incriminating fingerprints on the murder weapon To Kate, the idea of her brilliant friend killing anyone isWhen beautiful Janet Harrison asks English professor Kate Fansler to recommend a Manhattan psychoanalyst, Kate immediately sends the girl to her dear friend and former lover, Dr Emanuel Bauer Seven weeks later, the girl is stabbed to death on Emanuel s couch with incriminating fingerprints on the murder weapon To Kate, the idea of her brilliant friend killing anyone is preposterous, but proving it seems an impossible task For Janet had no friends, no lover, no family Why, then, should someone feel compelled to kill her Kate s analytic techniques leave no stone unturned not even the one under which a venomous killer once again lies coiled and ready to strike.

    • ✓ In the Last Analysis || ç PDF Read by ↠ Amanda Cross
      146 Amanda Cross
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ In the Last Analysis || ç PDF Read by ↠ Amanda Cross
      Posted by:Amanda Cross
      Published :2018-06-21T09:27:39+00:00

    1 thought on “In the Last Analysis

    1. I didn't like this at all. Maybe it's just a bit dated, but she was so annoyingly elitist. I wanted to stab her on the couch.

    2. A psychiatrist's patient is found murdered on his couch. His friend, an English professor, is sure he didn't do it, and investigates.First published in 1964, and now a nice little period piece.I found it fun and rather charming.

    3. Cross's debut 1964 mystery " introducing Kate Fansler, young, witty, erudite professor of literature", additionally a quote from a newspaper on the back cover claims this short novel is "well-plotted" NOT, quite slow paced "sophisticated", HMM, not sure I agree. "and witty" The only witty dialogue was found in chapter 11, which was actually quite entertaining. A student of Kate's is found murdered in the office of a psychiatrist friend of hers, who is the prime suspect in the murder. Kate is con [...]

    4. I'll go with 4 stars b/c the story was no only interesting, but I think it was probably very good for it's time but for the most part, it stood the test of time. Also, being 217 pgs, it was a quick read & nice to intermingle after reading many 300-600 pgs books. I'm looking forward to trying some other this in series. It was interesting in a time when forensics was barely heard of let alone DNA a pipe dream, something like ears, in addition to dental, could give a clue to one's identity.It's [...]

    5. I have stumbled upon-novels a year ago-ona separate mission glancing –these looked filled with malicious plays – withKate – the detective of - - She conceives she’s the omnipotent antagonist who has done nothing more special than to help push a special student past analytical therapy – beyond one therapist – to whom he is murdered. a dreadful plot filled with recognitions entitling yet first - - - ‘the last analysis’ novel of a series. promises Kate - related detectives – for [...]

    6. Liked it well enough. I think I would have been better off reading this series in its first go-around -- I might have enjoyed Kate's verbosity a little more as a grad student than I do today. I don't think that Amanda Cross had perfected her dialogue or her sense of timing back then because I found her dialogue improbable and stilted. Maybe her other books wear a little better, although I may -- or may not -- dip into another Kate Fansler mystery to find out. Still and all not bad.

    7. The first in the series, but not the best, so I advise skipping it. The plotting is very slow, and there are long bits which are just not very interesting. There is a relatively nice twist,but I did see it coming chapters before, so if you are a savvy mystery reader, I expect you will figure it out, also.

    8. Wenn ich weiter versuchen würde, dieses Buch zu lesen, würde ich vermutlich entweder an Langeweile sterben oder in eine neue Lesekrise rutschen. Daher: Abgebrochen und weg damit. (Braucht jemand sechs Bände der Büchergilde-Ausgabe der Serie? *g)

    9. Fun read!What a fun read! Caro!yn Heilbrun/Amanda Cross is such a gifted writer, and I love her characterization of Kate Fansler as a quirky and intelligent literature prof/wannabe detective.

    10. Picked up most of this series at a book sale. This one was not impressive. The storyline was ok but there was a lot of repetition. Good thing it was a short book. Hopefully rest of the series picks up.

    11. the mystery part's a mess, but how much does that matter in a book like this one? you could say that about sayers' novels, too. the detective-scholar is a figure that has always inspired a considerable amount of longing and attraction for me, for obvious reasons, and while kate fansler is no harriet vane, the lovely precision of her observations often filled me with a simple and spontaneous delight. right in the prologue, for example, before we've barely even been introduced to kate, we get this [...]

    12. The first Kate Fansler Mystery. As is often the case, I am reading the series out of sequence. So, having read a couple of the later ones, and enjoyed them very much, I have come back to the earliest story. I have to say that I did not enjoy it as much as the later ones. I think the author must still have been learning her trade somewhat. Or perhaps it was dated, though I did not actually notice that. Anyway, the trademark humor was not as good, and the conversations and literary references were [...]

    13. Fun, easy read. Literary references. Not great literature, but superior specimen of the crap detective novel genre.

    14. A quick and enjoyable read; definitely a Sayers pastiche, but Cross knew it. It was clever, and well enough written, a little more arch than I like, and the dialogue nothing like real people talk, but much of the narration was quite good. I am not certain if the plot was fair, but I do not read mysteries to figure it out ahead of the detectives, so I liked it well enough. Also, it was interesting; the detecting heroine, Kate Fansler, is a professor of English literature, and has a very Harriet V [...]

    15. I was listening to some podcasts of Nancy Pearl on KUOW, and this is one of the books she talked about in a discussion of classic women's mystery authors. And, lo! There it was sitting on my bookcase, unread and ready (as it has been for probably at least the last 15 years). I was a little surprised to see the copyright of 1964, because in a general sense, it doesn't feel particularly dated. But I just didn't dig it. The language felt pretentious and contrived, and Kate Fansler was just not my c [...]

    16. Apparently I enjoyed (sort of) a book in this series a few years ago, so since I was looking for something easy and light, I decided to read this first one in the series. I hated it. I knew I'd hate the main character early on, with declarations like this: "Yet, Kate thought the facts were not the sort the police, who must all have stanch lower-middle-class backgrounds, could understand: that a psychiatrist, though he might be more driven than other men, would (view spoiler)[ never commit a crim [...]

    17. WARNING--SPOILER I thought perhaps I had been too hard on Amanda Cross (Carolyn Heilbrun) when I read several of her books many years ago. On rereading this for a book club, I realized that she was still not a very good writer. Kate Fansler, a literature professor in NYC and her obvious alter ego, sounds like literature professors think they ought to sound (and since I'm one I can say that) and always have pertinent quotes to hand. In this one, when her good friend, a psychoanalyst, finds a dead [...]

    18. As I explore various female mystery writers who set the stage for the commercial success of so many wonderful writers today, I marvel at how many of these mysteries from the 1950s and 1960s are so focused on the psychological aspect of the criminals, victims and even the people solving the crimes. This book takes that a level higher, adding an academic layer. The crime: a woman is murdered on her analyst's couch. Her analyst is the prime suspects. The analyst's closest friend, a professor, does [...]

    19. I had read this mystery a number of years ago so decided to reread it. The first book in the series, it introduces Kate Fansler, a professor of literature at a NY college. Kate becomes involved in a murder case because her old friend and former lover, Emanuel, is accused of killing his psychoanalytic patient. There are many literary references in the book that are also part of the plot. The mystery was written in 1964 so is somewhat dated, but I liked that Cross made Kate a strong, intellectual [...]

    20. When beautiful Janet Harrison asks English professor Kate Fansler to recommend a Manhattan psychoanalyst, Kate immediately sends the girl to her dear friend and former lover, Dr. Emanuel Bauer. Seven weeks later, the girl is stabbed to death on Emanuel's couch--with incriminating fingerprints on the murder weapon. To Kate, the idea of her brilliant friend killing anyone is preposterous, but proving it seems an impossible task. For Janet had no friends, no lover, no family. Why, then, should some [...]

    21. The elitism got to me. I'm not really in sympathy with Fansler as a protagonist. She jars. The only character I really unreservedly liked was Messinger, and the author kept trying to draw parallels between him and Fansler that I didn't think were warranted.I am so very glad psychoanalysis has progressed beyond Freud. Argh. It's actively embarassing. Freud, I mean, not the book, which doesn't make any horrible misrepresentations or distortions that I could catch, just stereotypes.The actual solut [...]

    22. In the Last Analysis by Amanda Cross was published in 1964, the first of the Kate Fansler novels. Kate is young, and second wave feminism even younger, so it is understandable that she responds to Reed’s condescending comments with girlish good nature. It is clear that her determination and intellect are key to rescuing her friend from a murder charge, although her imagination is most noted by others. Delightfully, the dry wit characteristic of the Dorothy Sayers style of description is alread [...]

    23. This is the opening novel with Kate Fansler as the intellectual academic reluctant detective. We find all the ingredients in the first book that made the series interesting and different: intellectual puzzles, the mystery set in a somewhat ivory tower space, here, a psychoanalyst's office and home. You get literary discussions and mentions (Lord Peter *smile*), psychoanalytic debates about Freud, etc. The plot is fairly simple : why would a former student of Kate end up stabbed on the couch of t [...]

    24. Amanda Cross is the pseudonym for Carolyn Heilbrun, who taught for many years in the English Department at Columbia University. This last is important, at least to an English major (me), because it's the literary chatter in the series that draws me to it from time to time. In the Last Analysis is the first installment in the Professor Kate Fansler series. It was written in the mid-sixties and shows its age a bit, mostly in the dialogue, which sounds at times like a smarter, more urbane version o [...]

    25. I started this series because the main character is a professor of literature. The first book was a great disappointment - literature plays an almost non-existant part in the plot and the plot itself hangs on a ridiculous premise. I felt the author got to a point where she had to solve the crime and the best she could do was make up some inexplicable coincidence that tied the threads into a nice, neat ending. I have 3 more of the books in this series (found for pennies in a used book store), and [...]

    26. This was a mystery fun to read. I especially liked its humor, like in the scene at the end where Kate, the English professor and amateur sleuth, is aboard a ship to Europe and finds her friend Reed aboard as well. "I am going to Europe," he tells her. Protection." And when she asks who, he repliles "I wanted to protect you. . be sure the fever is gone. Detective fever. I've known a few people with cases like yours. They invariably sail for Europe and trip over a body on their way to the shower. [...]

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