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The Book of War

The Book of War Winner of the M Net Literary Award for debut novel An illiterate child is stranded on the southern tip of Africa The British and the Xhosa have been at war for eighty years and the boy signs up

  • Title: The Book of War
  • Author: James Whyle
  • ISBN: 9781431403479
  • Page: 475
  • Format: Paperback
  • Winner of the M Net Literary Award for debut novel, 2013.An illiterate child is stranded on the southern tip of Africa The British and the Xhosa have been at war for eighty years and the boy signs up in the hope of steady meals His new commander has assembled an assortment of convicts, sailors, and drunkards from the gutters of Cape Town They will be used to test the efWinner of the M Net Literary Award for debut novel, 2013.An illiterate child is stranded on the southern tip of Africa The British and the Xhosa have been at war for eighty years and the boy signs up in the hope of steady meals His new commander has assembled an assortment of convicts, sailors, and drunkards from the gutters of Cape Town They will be used to test the effectiveness of a revolutionary new weapon.The irregulars embark on journey through a landscape prowled by wild beasts, and the distinction between man and animal becomes ephemeral Based on firsthand accounts of the War of the Prophet, The Book of war converts the bare facts of history into something terrible and strange.

    • Best Read [James Whyle] ✓ The Book of War || [Business Book] PDF ↠
      475 James Whyle
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      Posted by:James Whyle
      Published :2019-02-21T08:08:59+00:00

    1 thought on “The Book of War

    1. Told from the perspective of a troop of irregulars fighting the Xhosa on the eastern frontier, this is a story of a brutal campaign of extermination. It is a blood-drenched tale in which the execution of women and children and the burning of "heathen" homesteads is routine. Whyle's use of antique language and his decision to restrain himself from lacing the text with his disapproval make it all the more powerful. An absolute masterpiece of storytelling.

    2. James is not a friend of mine. He’s a work colleague in that we are both freelance script writers for the same soap. I say this to make the point that, while I know James, I have no reason to write a review that is anything other than my honest opinion. The Book of War is an astonishingly good debut novel. It shines a disturbing and revealing light back through South African history giving the reader new understanding of the violence, racism and selfishness of our past and, perhaps more import [...]

    3. Okay, so it's a "cover version" of Blood Meridian, shifting it to South Africa. But it's no mere copy, and indeed a Blood Meridian without Judge Holden and all that poetic evocation of evil is a little like Voodoo Chile (Slight Return) without its lead guitar (actually that cover exists, it's by Angelique Kidjo, who like Mr Whyle takes the tune to Africa). And the language here, rather than dancing along a ledge between spare and Biblically ornate (in spite of the slightly portentous-sounding, a [...]

    4. Recommended by my high school English teacher, the Book of War is a brutal lyrical account of colonial power's ultimate triumph over native people trying to reclaim scarce land. That description suggests a good side and a bad side, but there are none in this fascinating but unremittingly bleak tale of savagery. Organized in chapters that are set out like an old-fashioned Dickensian serial, the book proceeds at a fast clip as green recruits are mauled and punished and for a time victory hangs in [...]

    5. I really wanted to like this book; the cover art was enticing and there were some rather impressive names on the back cover commending it. I struggled through it and have to say that, while it was not completely awful, it was a slog to complete.The writing style is (the author admits) heavily based on that of Cormac McCarthy and the story is based on his novel "Blood Meridian". This was quite evident from the start of reading it. This is perhaps great for literary fiction and academic honours, b [...]

    6. Derivative and pointless. Whyle attempts to transplant the heart of a lion into the body of a mongoose by gawkily shoehorning the diluted style, characters, motifs, and even entire passages from McCarthy's Blood Meridian into a South African setting.On the other hand, perhaps the entire thing is satire; a sublimely subtle indictment of the smug vacancy of literary post-modernity, in which case, bravo!

    7. Brilliantly written. The horrific imagery brought about by gentle words and your imagination as you realise the events unfolding.

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