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Sweeney Astray

Sweeney Astray Sweeney Astray is Seamus Heaney s version of the medieval Irish work Buile Suibne Its here Mad Sweeney undergoes a series of purgatorial adventures after he is cursed by a saint and turned into a bi

  • Title: Sweeney Astray
  • Author: Seamus Heaney
  • ISBN: 9780374518943
  • Page: 435
  • Format: Paperback
  • Sweeney Astray is Seamus Heaney s version of the medieval Irish work Buile Suibne Its here, Mad Sweeney, undergoes a series of purgatorial adventures after he is cursed by a saint and turned into a bird at the Battle of Moira Heaney s translation not only restores to us a work of historical and literary importance but offers the genius of one of our greatest living poetsSweeney Astray is Seamus Heaney s version of the medieval Irish work Buile Suibne Its here, Mad Sweeney, undergoes a series of purgatorial adventures after he is cursed by a saint and turned into a bird at the Battle of Moira Heaney s translation not only restores to us a work of historical and literary importance but offers the genius of one of our greatest living poets to reinforce its claims on the reader of contemporary literature.

    Sweeney Astray A Version from the Irish Seamus Heaney Sweeney Astray is Seamus Heaney s version of the medieval Irish work Buile Suibne Its here, Mad Sweeney, undergoes a series of purgatorial adventures after he is cursed by a saint and turned into a bird at the Battle of Moira. Sweeney name Sweeney is a surname that, though closely associated with Ireland, is of Scottish origin, derived from the Gaelic Mac Suibhne meaning son of Suibhne The Gaelic personal name Suibhne was originally a byname meaning pleasant or well disposed The Gaelic personal name was also used an equivalent to the unrelated Old Norse personal name Sveinn, meaning boy, servant. Garcinia Cambogia Alison Sweeney Garcinia Cambogia Garcinia Cambogia Alison Sweeney Garcinia Cambogia Gummies At Walgreens Garcinia Cambogia Alison Sweeney Garcinia Genix Garcinia Green Freemasons The silent destroyers Deist religious cult Glossary of the Occult definitions Templars Knights Templar A religious, military and banking order Knights of the Temple of Solomon founded by Crusaders in Jerusalem to defend the Holy Sepulchure and Christian pilgrims a kind of Foreign Legion. Seamus Heaney Seamus Justin Heaney MRIA e m s h i n i April August was an Irish poet, playwright and translator He received the Nobel Prize in Literature Among his best known works is Death of a Naturalist , his first major DVMPE TV FAN PODCASTING The DVMPE has been developing a range of original content, such as Comedy show The Windy City Rejects and topical debate show Push the Button with David Vox Tradition in Action Updates News Latest updates and articles from Tradition In Action The Most Devious Killers of All Time Crafty Serial The killers in this book are not your ordinary murderers They had plans for the corpses Some of them sold the meat from the bodies Another used body parts to make medicine, and yet another made and sold soaps and teacakes you read that right from the corpses. Elektra Marvel Cinematic Universe Wiki FANDOM powered Elektra, also known as Elektra Natchios, is an assassin who was trained under Stick, the same member from the Chaste who later trained Matt Murdock She fell in love with Murdock during a mission for Stick to bring Murdock into the organization She returned to his life after years of absence Chi Raq Rotten Tomatoes Chi Raq is a modern day adaptation of the ancient Greek play Lysistrata by Aristophanes After the murder of a child by a stray bullet, a group of women led by Lysistrata organize against the on

    • × Sweeney Astray || ☆ PDF Download by ✓ Seamus Heaney
      435 Seamus Heaney
    • thumbnail Title: × Sweeney Astray || ☆ PDF Download by ✓ Seamus Heaney
      Posted by:Seamus Heaney
      Published :2018-09-06T00:33:29+00:00

    1 thought on “Sweeney Astray

    1. "Sweeney Astray" is Seamus Heaney's version of a very old Irish poem that sounds strikingly modern. Sweeney, the King of Dal-Arie, becomes involved in a territorial dispute with the priest Ronan. After Sweeney killed one of Ronan's priests, the cleric cursed the king, who, at the battle of Moria suddenly lost his wits and courage and fled, the text says, like a bird, literally. He spent the rest of his life mostly in trees, eating watercress and often speaking in poems, many of which lament his [...]

    2. A fascinating work of un-categorizable Medieval literature that combines, juxtaposes, and cherishes contradiction: poetry v. prose, narrative v. lyric, madness v. sanity, war bravery v. bird-like fear, here v. there, heroism v. ignominy, saintliness v. sinning, etc etc.I came to it from Steven Moore's terrific The Novel, an Alternate History(although I've owned a copy since my grad. school days as a Medievalist) and couldn't be more pleased I did. I'm not sure if it's prosimetric format exactly [...]

    3. This story is a combination of narrative and verse and tells a story based somewhat on historical events in 637 AD. Like gossip, the story takes on a life of its own. Sweeney, an Irish king insults and assaults a priest. (His wife tries to deter him by grabbing his cloak, but he gets out and makes his assault buck naked.) The king then is called to battle, which he loses. The priest puts a curse on him, and he goes mad, grows feathers and leaps and flies all over Ireland subsisting on watercress [...]

    4. Really beautiful translation. Granted, Heaney is best known for his Beowulf translation, but he just sits around translating every ol' thing sort of like our generation's Tolkien. Well written, clever word usage, beautiful story. Sweeney is a war hardened lord who after loosing a battle suffers from what we would identify as PTSD but his medieval world has no word or understanding of this. He goes on another journey constantly putting himself outside of a community as he can't allow himself to r [...]

    5. This good as it gets version of the Irish medieval saga, Buile Suibhne, isn’t all that good. Sweeney is a not too interesting king who offends a priest, as Ireland sits on the cusp of Christian supremacy, and is turned mad (and into a kind of bird). He flits around the country, fleeing from un-fated dangers until his fated death eventually occurs. Heaney is wonderful but the tale lost whatever tragic potential it carried long ago and works best as a kind of early travelogue of the Irish countr [...]

    6. A friend who shares my love of Flann O'Brien gave me a copy of Heaney's Sweeney many years ago and I thought of it wistfully when Heaney made his last leap a few weeks ago. The story is of Sweeney the Celtic king and his adventures after he is cursed with madness by a cleric. There is no plot to speak of, just a narrative broken by spontaneous verse delivered by Sweeney as he is driven throughout Ireland by his madness and further encounters with the Church. The theme is of relentless persecutio [...]

    7. After reading Heaney's translation of Beowulf, I was excited to read his narrative/verse translation of the Irish legend of "mad" Sweeney, based loosely on events from 600-700 AD. Sweeney is an Irish king who insults and, in the buff, assaults a priest. His wife is somewhat complicit in the scandalous assault in that she tries to grab his cloak to stop him, but in so doing causes an unfortunate wardrobe malfunction. Sweeney then goes to battle, loses, and becomes a wanderer. He traverse Ireland, [...]

    8. Despite the "author" of Sweeney Astray being listed as "Anonymous" on this site, this particular translation was actually done by poet (and Beowulf, translator), Seamus Heaney. Although I understand that the repetition of words/facts and the constant shifting from prose to verse and back again are very much in line with the "original" legend, I found the format (and, again, the redundancies) a bit aggravating at times. For a relatively short play, the repetitions are particularly noticeable. I f [...]

    9. I first encountered some of these poems and associated prose passages in Opened Ground, the mid-'90s selection of work from Heaney's career, and was at the time not terribly enamoured of them. In that volume the aesthetic best of the pieces were selected, and it made them more than a bit obtuse and impenetrable at times — artistically pleasing, perhaps, but narratively adrift.Taken as a relatively complete whole — a number of lines are omitted for stylistic reasons — in my opinion those sa [...]

    10. The second version translation I've read of Heaney. I like how he frames this at the beginning, by explaining that this is an Irish tale about a king going mad, and that one should look to Lear for a similar kind of story. It helps to give context. But what makes this madman so exceptional is that he is masquerading as a bird. A real bird? The poem, the entire poem, keeps that a mystery. He's a man in a tree, and he has feathers, but anytime someone sees him up there, you get the feeling the who [...]

    11. I loved this wonderfully sad and funny story about Mad Sweeney and his lonely wanderings across Ireland and Briton. Sweeney's plight seems to me an awkward clash between old Celtic paganism and early Christianity; those who refuse to accept the latter are outcast, and are doomed to wander alone and bare, away from their tribe or clan. Perhaps Sweeney represents the last of the old ways of Eire, before the arrival of the religion from the East?

    12. For a review in Dutch, see Summer Challenge 2014 (message 41).After reading At Swim-Two-Birds, I just had to read Sweeney Astray and I wasn't disappointed in my expectations :-)

    13. This is the first translation of this medieval tale since 1913, but sometimes works go out of print for good reasons. Heaney does the best he can with this, but it just isn't an interesting piece of literature, not culturally, not historically, and certainly not aesthetically. There are far better works from medieval Irish than this.

    14. Heaney captures the erratic energy of Sweeney with surges of emotion and a great sense of humor. Having Irish, Welsh and Scottish ancestors, I better understand why my family and myself sometimes act like we do! A brilliant work.

    15. "I pined the whole night in Derville’s chapel for Dal-Arie and peopled the dark with a thousand ghosts."I feel you, guy who sprouted feathers and fell in love with trees. I feel you.

    16. I loved this book. A combination between epic poetry and prose, it brings to life Buile Suibhe, which I read years ago. Heaney's understanding of language and myth is unlike so few other writers and Sweeney Astray really shows his genious. By far my favorite of his works.

    17. One of the books dearest to my heart - it was the starting point for a project I did which turned out to be my favourite - well well well

    18. Very strange, but interesting. I don't think I was able to grasp the significance, what makes it such a classic.

    19. A quick enjoyable read about "mad" king Sweeney. For full enjoyment it probably requires a better grasp of Irish geography than I possess.

    20. Three and a half stars.Has that weird meandering, disjointed feeling of a lot of early Irish legends and poetry, but the language of the translation is beautiful.

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