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The Glass Bead Game

The Glass Bead Game The final novel of Hermann Hesse for which he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in The Glass Bead Game is a fascinating tale of the complexity of modern life as well as a classic of modern lit

  • Title: The Glass Bead Game
  • Author: Hermann Hesse Richard Winston Clara Winston Theodore Ziolkowski
  • ISBN: 9780312278496
  • Page: 429
  • Format: Paperback
  • The final novel of Hermann Hesse, for which he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946, The Glass Bead Game is a fascinating tale of the complexity of modern life as well as a classic of modern literature.Set in the 23rd century, The Glass Bead Game is the story of Joseph Knecht, who has been raised in Castalia, the remote place his society has provided for the inteThe final novel of Hermann Hesse, for which he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946, The Glass Bead Game is a fascinating tale of the complexity of modern life as well as a classic of modern literature.Set in the 23rd century, The Glass Bead Game is the story of Joseph Knecht, who has been raised in Castalia, the remote place his society has provided for the intellectual elite to grow and flourish Since childhood, Knecht has been consumed with mastering the Glass Bead Game, which requires a synthesis of aesthetics and scientific arts, such as mathematics, music, logic, and philosophy, which he achieves in adulthood, becoming a Magister Ludi Master of the Game.

    • ↠ The Glass Bead Game || ☆ PDF Read by ↠ Hermann Hesse Richard Winston Clara Winston Theodore Ziolkowski
      429 Hermann Hesse Richard Winston Clara Winston Theodore Ziolkowski
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ The Glass Bead Game || ☆ PDF Read by ↠ Hermann Hesse Richard Winston Clara Winston Theodore Ziolkowski
      Posted by:Hermann Hesse Richard Winston Clara Winston Theodore Ziolkowski
      Published :2018-09-09T12:03:56+00:00

    1 thought on “The Glass Bead Game

    1. There’s a scene in Antonio Tabucchi’s Indian Nocturne in which the narrator meets an Indian intellectual who asks him, among other things, what he thinks of Hermann Hesse. The narrator, resenting the interruption and perhaps with a sense he is being mocked, heaps scorn on the German “spiritualist”, calling him sentimental and likening him to a sweet liqueur, and only later realises he hasn’t said what he thought of Hesse at all. In some way, these days, I suspect there’s a little of [...]

    2. The Lasting Effects of Young Reading: A Short MemoirI first read The Glass Bead Game almost 60 years ago. It changed my life. With just the right cues of romance, high-tech adventure, philosophical mystery, and heroism, the book invaded my adolescent mind, laid down roots and suggested a long term plan: I would one day be able to play the Game. And I succeeded, at least during a goodly portion of my adult life, when I wasn’t distracted by the trivialities of wealth, status, and religion. So I [...]

    3. “No permanence is ours; we are a waveThat flows to fit whatever form it finds” ― Hermann Hesse, The Glass Bead GameI remember reading Hesse's Siddhartha and Narcissus and Goldmund right out of high school. There was something both disquieting and uniquely calming about these strange little books that Hesse wrote detailing his love and fascination with Eastern thought and philosophy. I figured this year I would read the Glass Bead Game (and later Steppenwolf). It is in many ways Hesse's sub [...]

    4. A tremendous disappointment, especially given the shimmering praise the book garners on all sides. I realize I’m at odds with the world in judging this book harshly, and I realize there may yet be some dimension of brilliance here that I’m just not seeing, but grant me this, it’s not for lack of trying. No other novel have I ever laid down without a backward glance within a few dozen pages of the end, certain at last that the great payoff for my eight hundred pages of patience was never go [...]

    5. Second IntroductionI saw that a Goodreader commented on another review that they felt this was a book for young people, which caught my attention with a jolt because I had barely finished thinking that this was plainly a book written by an old man. Which it was. These are in no way contradictory notions, they even sit together as one of the themes of the book: "meaningful and meaningless cycle of master and pupil, this courtship of wisdom by youth, of youth by wisdom, this endless, oscillating g [...]

    6. I feel that I must open this review by stating that I am an unabashed fanboy of Hermann Hesse. I read everything that he had ever written at a whirlwind pace several years ago and still return to my favorites, Steppenwolf, Siddhartha and Demian, on a rotating yearly basis. That said, I have often heard that The Glass Bead Game is the magnum opus of Hesse's career. The purest expression of the themes that he had highlighted in his other works. If one were to read only one book by Hesse it should [...]

    7. This, his final novel makes it clear that all his works need to be read in their order as one edition leading up to his final life conclusion! A man caught within the depths of thought striving for something beyond his sight captures his heroic journey through his written words.A different voice from the Hesse of my college days. No longer redirecting my compass eastward toward a spirituality with a promise to enlarge consciousness. This is a firm clear voice that looks back to arrive at an unde [...]

    8. هذا كتاب هيرمان هيسه الأشهر و الأكبر , كُتب على مدار تسع سنين , و يضمّ معظم أفكار هيرمن هيسه التي عُرف بها فيما بعد إنّها النزعة نحو الذات , و التأمّل و اليقين الموجود هناك في داخلك , وحدة الوجود , التي تقاوم ماديّة العالم و سببيّته الصلبة , الطبيعة تتكلّم معك و بك , و الكائنات كلّ [...]

    9. This is surely one of the most beautiful dreams depicted in literature. It is also a reminder that even the most beautiful dreams cannot feed our longing, which is ultimately for a reconciliation with the Real. The Glass Bead Game is an allegory of the relationship between symbol and reality, between life and the magic lantern of the mind.Hesse's Castalia is a utopia of mind, which is born of and supported at great expense by a society recently ravaged by a terrible war. It is an enclosed place [...]

    10. I like Herman Hesse. I like Siddhartha, I remember liking Steppenwolf, I like huge sagas that probe the mind. I usuallylike weighty wordy novels where nothing in particular happens.I did not like the Glass Bead Game.I really did not like the Glass Bead Game.And I don’t understand how people did.First of all, I’ve gone through a lot of reviews. I was about fifty percent through the book, bored out of my mind, and I started reading reviews trying to get some motivation to finish this tome. I d [...]

    11. (Nice hat!)A good Tratactus on Society; on what distinguishes the normal ones from the elite ones.In Castalia, the Elite (or the Order) pursues the Games of the Mind and its cultivation. An elite member renounces material wealthd embraces poverty to become a Mandarin of the Mind. That is what Joseph Knecht did.Ah! Castalia, they learn meditation (Hesse calls it, so appropriately, psychic hygiene)d they're in the 23rd century.Students of the Order, most often, renounce marriage. They are quite fa [...]

    12. This is Hesse's epic novel that tells the story of Joseph Knecht, a boy who passes through the system of the Castalian Order to become the Glass Bead Game Magister. If the last sentence made any sense to you, chances are you have already read the book. Though once the book is read, that is about all it is about. The book is written by an unknown member of the Castalian Order who is retelling the story of Joseph Knecht. The Glass Bead Game is an intellectual game played encompassing all major are [...]

    13. إضافة هذه القراءة العتيقة التي وجدتها عندي من عام 2006ربما لو أتيح لي إعادة قراءة الرواية الآن بعد أن زاد في روحي كم كبير من الكتب و السنوات لكنت نظرت إليها بعين أخرى، و ما كنت لأدري ما أقول عنها الآن بأية حال هي رواية تميل لتكون مسنة و حكيمة---على كل هذه القراءة على ما كنت قضيته ف [...]

    14. While Hesse's masterpiece has the same theme as Siddhartha, it's not the same short, simple work as that classic. Magister Ludi's inventive setting and method takes the basically unchanged storyline (gifted young man progressing, achieving, and finally discovering the true meaning of life), and creates a sort of historical biography of the protagonist. One of the fun aspects of this work is The Glass Bead Game: he introduces an idea of representing ideas, mathematics, literature -- all knowledge [...]

    15. This book was a really incredible meditation on accomplishment, ambition, finding peace and the breach between intellectuals and reality. Hesse creates a reality in which an intellectual elite has created an entire society that lives above and beyond the rest of the world playing an incredibly esoteric game that seeks to connect all knowledge as a series of symbols. There were a number of things that struck me in this world. First of all, the connections to modern science, with its own increasin [...]

    16. الجمال. آسر قلوب الكثيرين ومالك أحلام الحالمين وغايةٌ عزَّ الوصول اليها لدى العديد من الساعين .لعبة هدفها التقاط ذلك النور وغايتها تقوية تلك الفقاعة البراقة وتغذيتها علَّها يوما تحتوي العالم في داخلها وهيهات لها ان تفعل.والأضواء تخطف أنظار الناظرين وكلٌ يرى النور في ناحي [...]

    17. The Glass Bead Game: Invented hundreds of years ago it combines all art and knowledge of Western culture, correlates and re-combines in infinitely combinations: world literature, sciences, fine arts, and, last but not least, music – according to fixed mathematical laws. People from far away travel to the province of Castalia to witness the annual multi-day festival of games. Castalia: The separate, secluded republic of scholars, artists, and glass bead players. The province supplies its elite [...]

    18. This book is full of ideas. The main part of the book is a biography of the main character Joseph Knecht. It is then followed by a dozen poems and three short stories, "the lives". These short stories at the end are definitely my favourite part of the novel. All that is lacking in terms of passion in the first part is present in these three short stories at the end, and they present all the same themes.The Glass Bead Game itself, as far as I can tell, seems to be something like abstract mathemat [...]

    19. Reading the blurb of this book, my first by Hesse, I was immediately fascinated and felt compelled to read it. I'd read some excerpt of his writing as a kid in my Japanese textbook at Saturday Japanese school, and the name Hermann Hesse (or ヘルマン・ヘッセ rather) had stayed in my memory for about as many years as the beads in the cute cover.Hesse's biography of Joseph Knecht was pleasant to read, though not moving. As Castalians, the elite of the elite in the country's intellectual wor [...]

    20. A friend of mine (a pure mathematician) says that the Glass Bead Game is obviously pure mathematics in a thinly disguised form. It's not exactly a slam-dunk, but I'm still surprised how few people there are who seem to believe this theory. You'd think it would at least be a respectable minority opinion.Turn it around: if the Game isn't pure mathematics, what is it? Just something he made up, that doesn't refer to any real intellectual discipline in particular, but is a hypothetical synthesis of [...]

    21. I was disappointed when I re-read this book. I remembered it as very moving and very significant. Upon re-reading I found it tedious and preachy. Hesse is trying to write a new kind of novel, one based on ideas instead of conflict. He succeeds, but the end product is boring. I also was bothered by the assumption that the life of the mind was open only to men -- women are somehow not qualified to share the glorious world of ideas. Hrmph.

    22. This is a truly unforgettable classic which incorporates science fiction, adventure, philosophy and futuristic elements all into one well-written story.

    23. The Glass Bead Game is Hesse's final work, and is supposed to lay out his ideas and philosophies more completely than anything previously. According to my foreword by Ziolkowski, this book represents a progression beyond both the simplistic, egocentric spiritualism of Siddhartha and the Nietzschean misanthropy of Steppenwolf. He also remarks on the book's form: a narration by a stodgy academic about the life of a luminary master. Like Carlsyle's 'Sartor Resartus', there is meant to be an ironic [...]

    24. This is Harry Potter without its female characters, its magic and magicians. Here we have Castalia, a "province" [more like the seminaries of today] where it population of masters and students devote themselves to studies, or to the "things of the mind". Outside of Castalia is the practical world [the world which most of us live in] devoted to knowledge not for its own sake, but knowledge to better the physical aspects of living.In Harry Potter, there's the battle between the good and bad magici [...]

    25. This is an excellent book, an intellectual treat for those who appreciate philosophical narratives, not necessarily full of action in a traditional understanding of the word. Here we are, in the future, mingling with scholars of an enormous academic institution, with no attempts being made to consider any possible technological or scientific developments. "The Glass Bead Game" feels a bit like a dream and when you read it, you can almost tell that Hesse was in fact a practitioner of meditation. [...]

    26. Hmmmm. This book was ponderously interesting. A world is created but ever so lightly as to leave much to the readers imagination. The glass bead game (unless I missed something) never seems to be played in epic battle proportions as described in this book, its never openly laid out other than just the basic idea. There is no real description of the differences that make up the world outside of what the main character is experiencing. Does that make sense? Its like you get this massive narrative [...]

    27. من هو يوزف كنشت ؟ هو كما تقص الرواية حكايته اللودي ماستر للعبة الكريات الزجاجية وهي لعبة الفلاسفة والمفكرين في الزمن المستقبلي والتي اجتثت من سطحية صحافة التسلية رواية اسسها هرمان عن زمن متخيل لمدرسة تشبه مدرسة فيثاغورس واكادمية افلاطون ومقرها هنا كاستاليا لها مقرات في اما [...]

    28. Could have been 200 pages less. On a similar note, I received an email from a Chinese friend of mine today who is in Australia for student exchange. This email reverberated many things in Hesse's Glass Bead Game. Here's an extract from the email to show you:tually, since I was born, I have lived in the university I am studying now. My father also graduated from that school and now is a chemistry engineer . A wall will protect the university from outside world. In the university, there are hospit [...]

    29. This book has had a great impact on me. It's one of those few books that made me love it deeply yet at the same time despise it entirely. It might sound surprising, especially since this is an unanimously loved and admired book -- even awarded with the Nobel prize; it might also seem awfully arrogant of me to compare my beliefs to the wisdom of a man like Hesse. But I have to. And I found many principles and ideas in this book, some of them only subtle insinuations, that I completely disagree wi [...]

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