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Doctor Who: The Happiness Patrol

Doctor Who The Happiness Patrol Helen A ruler of colony Terra Alpha is determined that happiness will prevail And if any killjoys insist on being miserable the fun guns of the Happiness Patrol will remove them or they will vanish

  • Title: Doctor Who: The Happiness Patrol
  • Author: Graeme Curry
  • ISBN: 9780426203391
  • Page: 169
  • Format: Paperback
  • Helen A, ruler of colony Terra Alpha, is determined that happiness will prevail And if any killjoys insist on being miserable, the fun guns of the Happiness Patrol will remove them or they will vanish into the Kandy Kitchen, where the Kandy Man will deal with them When the Doctor and Ace spend a night on the dark streets of Terra Alpha they have to keep a smile on theirHelen A, ruler of colony Terra Alpha, is determined that happiness will prevail And if any killjoys insist on being miserable, the fun guns of the Happiness Patrol will remove them or they will vanish into the Kandy Kitchen, where the Kandy Man will deal with them When the Doctor and Ace spend a night on the dark streets of Terra Alpha they have to keep a smile on their faces or else while making contact with the native Pipe People and trying to convince the colonists that they can have too much of a good thing even sweets and happiness.

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      169 Graeme Curry
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      Posted by:Graeme Curry
      Published :2018-06-12T01:36:58+00:00

    1 thought on “Doctor Who: The Happiness Patrol

    1. Another Seventh Doctor novelisation that doesn't really add much to the televised story, but then the Seventh Doctor is the only one with any novelisations that DO add anything to the stories as televised, so I shouldn't be too harsh. The transforming of the Kandy Man from massive Bertie Bassett rip-off with Mr Blobby's voice to tall pale man with red eyes was interesting, and would certainly have contributed to a vastly different tone for the show had he reached the broadcast in this incarnatio [...]

    2. One of the great things about novelizations is that they can give an alternate experience to the screen version. The 1990 novelization of the 1988 Doctor Who TV story The Happiness Patrol is a prime example of this. Graeme Curry takes his seventy odd minute TV story and expands it here with plenty of new details and some different characterization. The result makes this an enjoyable, and possibly even better, version of the story. Gone are some of the performances that hampered the original TV v [...]

    3. I really didn't take to this initially despite Rula Lenska's fruity reading voice - her rendition of Sylvester McCoy's Doctor was most peculiar and it took me half way through to get used to it (after that it seemed right!)However, it was an interesting, chilling story in which the Tardis gets painted a more 'cheerful' colour. Ace and the Doctor find themselves on a planet in the grip of a dictatorship enforcing 'happiness' - 'Happiness Will Prevail' sounds very much like 'Arbeit Macht Frei' Dis [...]

    4. A perfectly acceptable straight adaptation of the story as shown on TV. Curry doesn't have the verve and flair of Ben Aaronovich, the familiar readability of uncle Terrance, or the mania for adding extras of a Saward; as such if you've watched The Happiness Patrol reading the novelisation is a bit of a letdown. It doesn't add anything, and you miss the amazing performance of Sheila Hancock and the sheer gobsmacking chutzpah of the on screen Kandyman.A pleasant enough way of passing a couple of h [...]

    5. On television, "The Happiness Patrol" is a mix of the sublime and the ridiculous, and without a doubt one of the more controversial productions of the late 1980s. But freed from the limits of the TV studio and the director's choices, author Graeme Curry produces a novelization that is far more subdued, melancholy and contemplative than its outrageous TV counter-part. If you're only aware of what was broadcast in 1988, and are coming to this book for the first time, then you are in for a very ple [...]

    6. nhwvejournal/1079514ml?#cutid1[return][return]I wasn't overwhelmed by the original TV story, but Curry has produced a novelisation which is passionate and convinced - the rather odd plot holes remain, but liberated from cheap-looking special effects, it turns into rather a good yarn. Definitely one of those where the book is an improvement. Also an easy pass for the Bechdel test, with Helen A and her women warriors running around after Ace.

    7. Seventh Doctor and Ace. Not quite an improvement on the episode, but someone who has seen it is less apt to be disappointed by the novelisation than someone who has only read the novelisation may be by the show. Adheres quite closely to the show (some expansions, and it's a bit startling how different the description of the Kandy Man is), so there are some things the author neglected to describe and the setting seems just as curiously flat as in the studio-bound show.

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