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Euthyphro/Apology of Socrates/Crito

Euthyphro Apology of Socrates Crito Euthyphro has come to indict his own father for the murder of one of their laborers and Socrates questions him about the nature of justice and his grounds for taking action against his father Is he i

  • Title: Euthyphro/Apology of Socrates/Crito
  • Author: Plato John Burnet
  • ISBN: 9780198140153
  • Page: 398
  • Format: Paperback
  • Euthyphro has come to indict his own father for the murder of one of their laborers, and Socrates questions him about the nature of justice and his grounds for taking action against his father Is he impious for attempting to indict his own father, yet would he be guilty of impiety if he does not seek justice for the laborer s murder Together Euthyphro and Socrates examinEuthyphro has come to indict his own father for the murder of one of their laborers, and Socrates questions him about the nature of justice and his grounds for taking action against his father Is he impious for attempting to indict his own father, yet would he be guilty of impiety if he does not seek justice for the laborer s murder Together Euthyphro and Socrates examine the question.

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      Published :2019-01-25T08:21:09+00:00

    1 thought on “Euthyphro/Apology of Socrates/Crito

    1. Queria fazer esta review de forma diferente, começando por partilhar uma conversa que tive há dias com uma amiga sobre a morte e a experiência de morrer para, então, poder estabelecer uma relação com a obra e deixar algumas questões no ar. Sucede, porém, que quanto mais me adiantei na minha tentativa de o fazer, mais me fui afastando do tema central do livro e daquilo que tinha inicialmente pensado, de modo que acabou por perder o sentido. Assim sendo, e como o desânimo levou consigo a [...]

    2. I read this book as a part of my required ethics course in college at the University of Scranton (good olde Jesuit liberal arts education). I love this book. As a result of reading this book and taking the class, I declared Philosophy as my second major. This is a must read for everyone.cially anyone interested in Philosophy or ethics!

    3. An excellent way to meet Socrates, and Socrates is an excellent way to meet philosophy.

    4. Such a wonderful introduction to philosophy with taking a look into the mind of Socrates and his way of life, makes you question your beliefs in questioning on what grounds you base them on.

    5. I certainly wouldn't have objected to Socrates getting sentenced to death for his behavior. Such blatant and offensive moralizing should be punished.

    6. In these dialogues, Plato reports on the trial and sentencing of Socrates, and in so doing, outlines his philosophy. Although The Apology is the most famous of the group, I recommend reading all three dialogues together for the most comprehensive overview of Plato's ideas. Socrates has been accused of impiety, and the first dialogue contains his discussion with Euthypro on the nature of piety and impiety. Since Euthypro is on his way to accuse his father of this crime, it is particularly relevan [...]

    7. This slim volume collects Plato's dialogues that concern the death of Socrates. In "Euthyphro," Socrates engages the title character in a discussion on the nature of piety on his way to address the Senate. "Apology" is his powerful defense against charges of corrupting the youth of Athens. In "Crito," he explains to friends who would arrange his escape that, having benefited from the laws of the state in the past, he cannot violate them now simply because they inconvenience him.Obviously, these [...]

    8. This slim volume collects Plato's dialogues that concern the death of Socrates. In "Euthyphro," Socrates engages the title character in a discussion on the nature of piety on his way to address the Senate. "Apology" is his powerful defense against charges of corrupting the youth of Athens. In "Crito," he explains to friends who would arrange his escape that, having benefited from the laws of the state in the past, he cannot violate them now simply because they inconvenience him.Obviously, these [...]

    9. The stories in this book follow Socrates as written by Plato. None of the stories are first hand accounts because Socrates felt that something was lost when a tale or argument is written rather than spoken. The main plotline concerns Socrates trial. Euthyphro contains a massive dialogue about the will of the gods and right and wrong, The Defence covers the actual trial of Socrates, and Crito contains a lengthy dialogue about abiding to law for the sake of not undermining the government system. S [...]

    10. The Apology is really why I have this(not to leave out Crito and Euthyphro - but The Apology is THE work of Socrates whith,I think, the most impact).Learning about what we believe we know of Socrates and his surroundings at the time these works were written - the complex subtext is worth re-examining over the years. I also like to use this work as a learning tool for advanced high school Lincoln Douglas Debate students.

    11. This book was truly interesting. It posed many moral questions and spiritual. Being my first Philosophy book it was a bit hard to understand what was going on at first. If I went back to read it now I'm sure I would rank it higher than a 3/5.

    12. I've read a couple versions of this more than a few times each and there is always a little bit more to take each time. It really is a great introduction to Socrates (and Plato). It's a prime example of someone who is many things, but never anything other than authentic.

    13. "your zeal is invaluable, if a right one; but if wrong, the greater the zeal the greater the danger."

    14. Not a great book. Had a hard time following it and had no clue what was going on most of the time in any of the stories. I do not recommend this to others.

    15. I read this for my Great Works class. His way of arguing is very intriguing to me. He really works off of the idea of the more you know, the more you realize the less you actually do know.

    16. Required reading for my history degree. The unexamined life is no life for a human being to live.

    17. Still remember the cerebral stretches I underwent when going through the paces of "Euthyphro" as a mere Frosh

    18. Read for first philosophy class. Leaned more about Socrates after reading it. Was able to find some good quotes here and there. Can be hard to understand some times.

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