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Adam: Legend of the Blue Marvel

Adam Legend of the Blue Marvel An unstoppable super villain attacks New York City and the Mighty Avengers fall before him Where did Anti Man come from And who can stop his overwhelming rampage Now Iron Man races to find the only m

  • Title: Adam: Legend of the Blue Marvel
  • Author: Kevin Grevioux Mat Broome
  • ISBN: 9780785124092
  • Page: 134
  • Format: Paperback
  • An unstoppable super villain attacks New York City and the Mighty Avengers fall before him Where did Anti Man come from And who can stop his overwhelming rampage Now, Iron Man races to find the only man who s ever defeated Anti Man THE BLUE MARVEL a hero the world hasn t seen since 1961 Will Tony Stark uncover the truth behind Blue Marvel s disappearance andAn unstoppable super villain attacks New York City and the Mighty Avengers fall before him Where did Anti Man come from And who can stop his overwhelming rampage Now, Iron Man races to find the only man who s ever defeated Anti Man THE BLUE MARVEL a hero the world hasn t seen since 1961 Will Tony Stark uncover the truth behind Blue Marvel s disappearance and will Blue Marvel ever recover from it Kevin Grevioux New Warriors and Mat Broome The End League join forces to create Marvel s newest powerhouse super hero Collects Adam Legend of the Blue Marvel 1 4.

    • ✓ Adam: Legend of the Blue Marvel || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Kevin Grevioux Mat Broome
      134 Kevin Grevioux Mat Broome
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Adam: Legend of the Blue Marvel || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Kevin Grevioux Mat Broome
      Posted by:Kevin Grevioux Mat Broome
      Published :2019-01-11T06:36:35+00:00

    1 thought on “Adam: Legend of the Blue Marvel

    1. I first encountered Blue Marvel in Mighty Avengers Volume 2: Family Bonding. (Great book, I highly recommend it.) Maybe this is all there is when it comes to Blue Marvel, I'm not sure. As a character, he's really interesting: a black superhero in the 60s, he walked away from the cape at the president's orders. Because the world wasn't ready for a black superhero. This part of his story is told quite well, and Adam himself really carries the book.But. The storyline with Anti-Man is almost yawning [...]

    2. Necessarily heavy-handed retcon miniseries introducing the Blue Marvel, a Superman analogue obliged to retire from Marvel Universe superheroics in 1962 because his blackness was scaring people. The injustices it addresses were (and are) real, and exactly the sort of issues Marvel did address in the sixties but couldn't face quite this directly until now. Still, unlike eg Truth (which noted that the experiments used to make Captain America would have been unlikely to get their first test on a whi [...]

    3. Vote: 3,5 starsWhat if Superman was black?The premise of this comic book was really good and the story is a nice tuckle against racism and discrimination: a Superman-like hero in the 60s, when racism was not just a despicable and nasty point of view, but an insidious, accepted and institutionalized one, quit by Kennedy's order after is costume is torn apart in a battle revealing his black skin and turning against him the same people he was defending.A real shame that art was not much as appealli [...]

    4. Grevioux makes a compelling story. The only thing that bothered me was how "holier than thou" Iron Man was during the whole thing. I just wanted Adam to punch him but then you realize he doesn't because Adam is a better person than all of us.

    5. This is a powerful story that is marred by stupid errors and inconsistencies. The premise of "what if Superman was black in the early years of the Civil Rights movement" puts a spotlight on race relations then and unfortunately now. Unfortunately because the way the characters reacted to having the most powerful superhero as African American is the same way people reacted to having an African American president. The raw emotion that is displayed by Adam in this story is well written. The apologi [...]

    6. I thought the story was well thought out and great for a new idea ank you Gregory I give the story an eight an it's great to see a superman level black character .I hope to see more of this character.

    7. A strong and intriguing first half let down by cliche, inconsistent art and narrative that preached more than told story in the final parts.

    8. Great one off story about the Blue Marvel, his back story, and his return to heroism despite all the wrong the country did to him. I'd never heard of the Blue Marvel until this TPB and it was a good, interesting, conflict to have a black veteran physicist superhero during the Jim Crowe Laws days. Though what amazed me even more was that he was written with the education for a physics degree, even working in the military, back then, they weren't much more than cannon fodder for a sick government [...]

    9. Great one off story about the Blue Marvel, his backstory, and his return to heroism despite all the wrong the country did to him. I'd never heard of the Blue Marvel until this TPB and it was a good, interesting, conflict to have a black veteran physicist superhero during the Jim Crowe Laws days. Though what amazed me even more was that he was written with the education for a physics degree, even working in the military, back then, they weren't much more than cannon fodder for a sick government i [...]

    10. It's easy to dismiss this as just a superhero polemic, a book where characters make rhetorical points while punching each other. And while that is definitely a thing that happens - oh my god, you guys. The points-while-punching are thought out. They address subtle nuances of a terribly complex and emotional situation. Opposing viewpoints aren't shouted down - well, a lot of stuff is shouted, but you know what I mean. "You shouldn't have done this!" is responded to with "What else could we have d [...]

    11. With the X-Men, Marvel Comics has told countless stories that were allegorical and parallel to many social ills that are rooted in fear. With Adam: Legend of the Blue Marvel, Marvel Comics tells a more straightforward story that provides a definition of racism as oppressive behavior rooted in prejudice and fear, a definition that has been watered down since the Civil Rights era, which is when the country's first black superhero came into play, according to Marvel Comics. In present day United St [...]

    12. The basic premise of this story is: What would happen is Superman was black and racism isn't just a nasty worldview. But full blown government policyLike it was in 60s America.And this is where this comic gets interesting. Set in Marvels world full of superheroes, and the avengers protect the world from evil. Except this time they are defeated and only someone called "The Blue Marvel" could turn the tide. The story itself starts in present-day and switches between flashbacks and the present to t [...]

    13. Eh, this was pretty unspectacular. The whole idea of creating a "classic" character from an earlier time period and inserting them into existing continuity has become such a cliche--I blame Brian Michael Bend is for popularizing the technique--and likewise the idea of the Avengers being unable to beat a villain until along comes a new character at just the right time who triumphs where they failed. Add a veneer of '60s racial equality over the top and you've pretty much got this GN in a nutshell [...]

    14. I'm very much liking Blue Marvel in the current Mighty Avengers on-going so I was happy to read his introduction to the Marvel U here. Something like the Sentry's roll-out but not as interesting or creative, and BM's first book often reads too much like a square history of black/white race relations in the USA. The c-grade artist's skill is defeated by the inability to draw a convincing JFK.

    15. Good, but not greatI've read a lot more about Adam Brashear since this book came out. The character is much more interesting now than I doing him in this book.That being said, it was a fun read.

    16. The Ultimate Great graphic novel! Throughly explains Adams history without shying away from impact his blackness had on him being one of the first heroes or how the government and fellow heroes took him being black.

    17. I liked it. It could come off as a bit verbose, but only to those who know the history of African Americans during that time period.

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